Essential Oils

"Our family LOVES Healing Balm - it goes on just about anything and everything - even my cat has had it applied to a bad cut on an ear!! I love the fact that it heals things quickly and I love the smell too! Thanks for having the inspiration of creating it."



Lisa Quillman - Nova Scotia

About this Product.

Essential Oils will enhance your overall health, beauty and psychological well being, as well as help you body build a stronger immune system. Aromatherapy can help reduce stress and give you more energy, as well as improve your complexion and treat skin irritations.

Basil
Plant Part: Leaves & flowers
Extraction Method: Steam Distilled
Origin: Italy
Description: An annual Herb, Basil grows 20-50 cm (8-20 in), and when in bloom the purple- white flowers appear in clusters, framed by oval pointed green leaves.
Common Uses: Prized in Ayurvedic medicine for its ability to strengthen compassion, faith and bring clarity. Basil clears the sinuses, promotes digestion and stimulates circulation, especially in the respiratory system.
Note: Top
Blends well with: Basil essential oil blends well with Bergamot, Clary Sage, Clove Bud, Lime, Eucalyptus, Juniper, Lemon, Neroli, and Rosemary
Cautions: May irritate sensitive skin. Do not use during pregnancy

Benzoin
Plant Part: Resin
Extraction Method: Solvent (food grade) extraction
Origin: India
Description: The Benzoin tree is from Java, Sumatra and Thailand that grows to 8 meters (20 feet). Deep incisions are made in the trunk of the tree from which the grayish color sap exudes. When the resinous lump becomes hard and brittle, it is collected from the bark.
Common Uses: Antiseptic, anti-depressant, anti-inflammatory, carminative, deodorant, diuretic, expectorant, sedative and vulnerary. Benzoin is used as an essential oil as well as a fixative in perfumes. Benzoin essential oil can be used for bronchitis, coughs, colds, wounds, acne, eczema, psoriasis, rheumatism, arthritis, scar tissue, circulation, nervous tension, stress, muscle pains, chilblains, rashes and mouth ulcers.
Note: Base
Blends well with: Benzoin essential oil blends well with Bergamot, Coriander, Frankincense, Juniper, Lavender, Lemon, Myrrh, Orange, Petitgrain, Rose and Sandalwood.
Cautions: No known toxicity

Bergamot
Plant Part: Crude Fruit peel
Extraction Method: Cold Press
Origin: Italy
Description: The tree can grow up to four meters high, with star-shaped flowers, and smooth leaves, bearing citrus fruit resembling a cross between an orange and a grapefruit but in a pear-shape. The fruit ripens from green to yellow.
Common Uses: Bergamot essential oil can be used in the treatment of depression, stress, tension, fear, hysteria, infection (all types including skin), anorexia, psoriasis, eczema and general convalescence
Note: Middle
Blends well with: Black Pepper, Clary sage, Cypress, Frankincense, Geranium, Jasmine, Mandarin, Nutmeg, Orange, Rosemary, Sandalwood, Vetiver and Ylang Ylang.
Cautions: Bergamot oil can cause severe burns when used on sensitive skin that has been exposed to sunlight due to the high bergaptene content.

Calamus Root
Plant Part: Root
Extraction Method: Steam Distillation
Origin: Slovenija
Description: A perennial plant, it grows to a height of 1m with a spread of 0.5m. The rhizome is horizontal, creeping, cylindrical, branched and up to 2m long, with a spicy aroma; the stem is erect, unbranched and flowering; the leaves are yellowish green, erect, sword shaped, with entire margins, radical and sheathing; the flowers are greenish yellow, with a keeled stalk and on a densely crowded spike; the fruit are greenish berries. Indigenous to the northern hemisphere, it prefers lake margins, swampy ditches, or marshes in a protected position. It is frost resistant, but drought tender.
Common Uses: It is a stimulating nervine antispasmodic, and a general tonic to the mind. As a rejuvenative for the brain and nervous system, it is used to promote cerebral circulation, to stimulate self-expression, and to help manage a wide range of symptoms in the head, including neuralgia, epilepsy, memory loss and shock. It is used in the Philippines for rheumatism and memory problems. In Korea, it is an ingredient in a type of moonshine called Immortals' Booze. Research in China has shown the essential oil in this rhizome to be sedating and neuroprotectant.
Note: Base
Blends well with: lavender, tea tree, rosemary, clary sage, geranium, marjoram
Cautions: Caution is advised on the use of this essential oil, since large doses can cause mild hallucinations. The essential oil in the roots of this plant contains the compound asarone. This has tranquilizing and antibiotic activity, but is also potentially toxic. Use well diluted and avoid during pregnancy.

Camphor (white)
Plant Part: Wood
Extraction Method: Steam distillation. Camphor oil is extracted by steam from the chipped wood, root stumps and branches. It is then rectified under vacuum and filter pressed. White camphor oil is the first distillation fraction.
Origin: China
Description: The Camphor tree can grow up to 35 meters (100 feet) and camphor is found in every part of the tree. C. camphora is an evergreen tree looking not unlike linden; it grows to a great size, is many branched, flowers white, small and clustered, fruit a red berry much like cinnamon.
Common Uses: The therapeutic properties of Camphor oil include the following: anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, cardiac, carminative, diuretic, febrifuge, insecticide, laxative, rubefacient, stimulant and vulnerary. Camphor oil can be used in the treatment of nervous depression, acne, inflammation, arthritis, muscular aches and pains, sprains, rheumatism, bronchitis, coughs, colds, fever, flu and infectious diseases. It is a well-known preventive of moths and other insects, such as worms in wood; natural history cabinets are often made of it, the wood of the tree being occasionally imported to make cabinets for entomologists.
Note: Top
Blends well with: Basil, Cajuput, Chamomile, Lavender and Melissa, Caraway; Pennyroyal; 
Rosemary

Cautions: Camphor oil is powerful oil and should be used with care. Overdosing can cause convulsions and vomiting. Pregnant women or persons suffering from epilepsy and asthma should not use it.

 

Cape May
Plant Part: Stems & Leaves
Extraction Method: Steam Distilled
Origin: South Africa
Description: Cape May is a medium to large woody shrub with small heath-like leaves and fragrant flowers. It is grown on the mountains of the southern coastal region of South Africa. In the spring and summer the bush is a mass of small, white star-like flower and is used extensively as an insect repellent, and a deodorizer.
Common Uses: Cape May is reputed to assist in easing ache and pains of cold and flu, and relieving sore throat. As a gentle diuretic, Cape May useful for a gentle detox and mild water retention. In many instances, this essential oil has been reported to be very useful as an insect repellent. Cape May is also credited with being antiseptic, deodorant, sedative, restorative.
Note: Middle to Top
Blends well with: Basil, bergamot, Cape chamomile, clary sage, fennel, geranium, ginger, jasmine, juniper, lavender, neroli, patchouli, petitgrain, vetiver, ylang-ylang.
Cautions: No known toxicity.

Carrot Seed
Plant Part: Seeds
Extraction Method: Steam Distillation
Origin: France
Description: It is an annual or biennial herb with hairy leaves and umbels of white lacy flowers with purple centers.
Common Uses: Carrot Seed is fantastic for skin care (revitalizing and toning) and considered one of the best Essential Oils for Mature Skin. Carrot seed oil also assists in removing toxin and water build up in the skin giving it a fresher more firmer appearance. Carrot seed oil has a detoxifying effect on the liver and cleans the digestive system and the body as a whole. It is helpful for arthritis, gout, edema, rheumatism and the accumulation of toxins in muscles and joints. Carrot seed strengthens the mucus membranes in the nose, throat and lungs, thus has a beneficial effect on problems such as bronchitis and influenza.
Note: Middle
Blends well with: Frankincense, Lavender, Rosewood, Blue Cypress, Geranium

Cautions:Should be avoided during pregnancy.



Cassia
Plant Part: Leaves
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: China
Description: An evergreen tree growing to 7 m with a white aromatic bark and angular branches. The leaves are oblong-lancelate about 18 cm (7 in) long. Small yellow flowers hang from long stocks, and bloom in early summer. Cassia grows in hot, wet, tropical climates both wild and commercially. The stems are cut down when the bark is mature. The bark is removed in short lengths and dried, with some varieties rolling into quills.
Common Uses: Cassia is a tonic, carminative and stimulant. It is used to treat nausea and flatulence. It is also used alone or in combination to treat diarrhea. Chinese and Japanese scientists have found that cassia has sedative effects and lowers high blood pressure and fever in experimental animals. The oil has antiseptic properties, killing various types of bacteria and fungi. Cassia oil is used mainly as a carminative (for relieving colic and griping) or as a stomach tonic. It can also be used for colds, influenza, fevers, arthritis and rheumatism.
Note: Top
Blends well with: Benzoin, Cloves, Coriander, Cardamom, Frankincense, Ginger, Grapefruit, Lavender, Rosemary and Thyme.
Cautions: Dermal irritant, dermal sensitizer and is a mucus membrane irritant and must be avoided in pregnancy.

Cedarwood Atlas
Plant Part: Wood
Extraction Method: Steam Distillation
Origin: USA
Description: A pyramid-shaped majestic evergreen tree, up to 131 ft. high. The wood itself is hard and strongly aromatic because of the high percentage of essential oil it contains, and the essential oil is obtained by steam distillation.
Common Uses: Acne, arthritis, bronchitis, coughing, cystitis, dandruff, dermatitis, stress. Warming, uplifting, and toning. Comforting and reviving. Considered an aphrodisiac in that it is grounding and inspiring at the same time.
Note: Base
Blends well with: Cedarwood Atlas blends well with the citrus oils, giving them a base note that very nicely complements them. Also with Rosemary, Chamomile, Eucalyptus and many more.
Cautions: Non-toxic, non-irritant. Avoid during pregnancy.

Chamomile German
Plant Part: Flower head
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: Hungary
Description: The Chamomile German is an annual, reaching up to 60cm in height. From May to August it flowers, sporting top-heavy flower heads with a fragrance similar to apples.
Common Uses: Abscesses, allergies, arthritis, boils, colic, cuts, cystitis, dermatitis, dysmenorrhea, earache, flatulence, hair, headache, inflamed skin, insect bites, insomnia, nausea, neuralgia, PMS, rheumatism, sores, sprains, strains, stress, wounds. The therapeutic properties of Chamomile German oil include: analgesic, anti-spasmodic, antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, emmenagogue, digestive, hepatic and vulnerary. German Chamomile contains Azulene, a powerful anti-inflammatory agent. This blue crystal is not actually present in the plant, but forms in the oil and only a small quantity is needed. The quality is generally graded by the azulene content and good quality oil should contain between 4.5 - 5%. It is this azulene that gives it a deep blue color.
Note: Middle
Blends well with: Bergamot, Clary sage, Lavender, Geranium, Jasmine, Tea tree, Grapefruit, Rose, Lemon and Ylang Ylang.
Cautions: Non-toxic and non-irritant, yet since they can be used as an emmenagogue, it should be avoided during pregnancy.

Cinnamon Bark (Co2)
Plant Part: Bark
Extraction Method: CO2 Extraction
Origin: France
Description: The cinnamon tree is an evergreen native to China and Main land South East Asia.It is an evergreen which reaches maturity at 10-12 years. It has shiny, leathery green leaves, and small, white flowers with oval shaped purple berries.
Common Uses: Cinnamon Bark essential oil is highly respected as having antiseptic properties. Some material indicates that it is perfect in topical applications, and with its pleasant scent, a perfect additive to creams, lotions, and soaps. Other materials recommend that Cinnamon Bark be avoided in aromatherapy. From a spiritual perspective, it is believed to have a warming, uplifting characteristic.
Note: Middle to Base
Blends well with:
Frankincense, Lavender, Cedarwood, Elemi, citrus oils, Ylang Ylang and other floral notes, Benzoin.
Cautions: Cinnamon Bark essential oil can be irritating to the skin and mucous membranes - particularly in large doses. It should always be used in dilution

Citronella Ceylon
Plant Part: Gum
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: Sri Lanka
Description: Citronella oil is extracted from a resilient grass (Cymbopogon nardus) native to Sri Lanka and Java. It is a very aromatic perennial that grows approximately 1 meter (3 feet) in height.
Common Uses: Citronella Ceylon is credited with having therapeutic properties as an antiseptic, deodorant, insecticide, parasitic, tonic and as a stimulant. Nonetheless, most people will associate it with its insecticidal properties. Many commercial repellents contain Citronella Ceylon, and it is often used in combination with Cedarwood to produce a pleasant smelling natural insect repellent. It will also be seen in soaps and candles, and it has common applications in massage. This oil can also help with minor infection, but is more commonly known for its ability to assist in combating colds and flu. Citronella can also be used for excessive perspiration and for conditioning oily skin and hair.
Note: Top
Blends well with: Citronella Ceylon blends well with most oils, but specifically well with Bergamot, Bitter Orange, Cedarwood, Geranium, Lemon, Orange, Lavender and Pine.
Cautions: Citronella may irritate sensitive skin.

Clary Sage
Plant Part: Leaves and Flowers
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: Bulgaria
Description: Clary Sage is a short biennial or perennial herb that grows up to 1 meter in height (approximately 3 feet). It has large, hairy leaves with small bluish - purple flowers.
Common Uses: Clary Sage is viewed by aromatherapists as an antidepressant, and antispasmodic, deodorant, emmenagogue, hypotensive, nervine, sedative, tonic and uterine. It is well known for providing a euphoric action, for balancing uterine issues, and as an agent to clean greasy hair. There is also some documentation of its effectiveness in helping to relax the spasms of asthma.
Note: Middle
Blends well with: Clary Sage essential oil blends well with generally any essential oil, though it works particularly well with Bergamot, Cedarwood, Roman and German Chamomile, Geranium, Jasmine, Lavender, Neroli, Orange, Rosewood, Sandalwood and Ylang Ylang.
Cautions: Clary Sage is non-toxic, and non-sensitizing. It is not to be used during pregnancy.

Clementine
Plant Part: Crude Peel
Extraction Method: Cold Press
Origin: Italy
Description: The Clementine tree is a cross between a sweet orange tree and a mandarin tree.
Common Uses: Clementine essential oil is well known for its ability to revitalize, while at the same time, balance when it comes to combating insomnia.
Note: Middle to Top
Blends well with: Clementine blends easily with other essential oils - particularly those from the citrus and floral family.
Cautions: Clementine essential oil is phototoxic. All customers should avoid direct sunlight after applying the oil

Clove Bud
Plant Part: Buds
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: Singapore
Description: Clove is derived from the tree Syzygium aromaticum. It is a slender evergreen that grows up to 12 meters in height (approximately 36 feet). At the start of the rainy season, long buds appear. They change color over time and are beaten from the trees and dried. These are the cloves sold commercially.
Common Uses: Clove bud essential oil is an effective agent for minor pains and aches (particular dental pain), and is helpful when battling flus and colds.
Note: Middle
Blends well with: other spice oils, citronella, grapefruit, lemon, orange, peppermint, rosemary, and rose.
Cautions: Clove Bud oil can cause sensitization in some and should be used in dilution. It should also be avoided during pregnancy.

Clove Leaf
Plant Part: Leaves
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: India
Description: Clove is derived from the tree Syzygium aromaticum. It is a slender evergreen that grows up to 12 meters in height (approximately 36 feet). At the start of the rainy season, long buds appear. They change color over time and are beaten from the trees and dried. These are the cloves sold commercially.
Common Uses: Clove Leaf is credited as being beneficial for skin irritations, digestive issues, and bad breath. Because of the cheaper price, it is often substituted for Clove Bud in soaps and candles.
Note: Middle
Blends well with: Blends well with rose, lavender, clary sage, bergamot, bay, ylang ylang, and oils from the spice family and from the citrus family.
Cautions: Direct application on the skin should be avoided

Costus Root
Plant Part: Roots
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: India
Description: A large, erect, perennial plant up to 2m high with a thick tapering root and numerous almost black flowers. The dried roots are macerated in warm water then subjected to steam distillation.
Common Uses: Costus Root essential oil has the following properties: antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, bactericidal, carminative, digestive, expectorant, febrifuge, hypotensive, stimulant, stomachic, and tonic. It is also used as an incense, and as a fixative and fragrance component in cosmetics and perfumes. The food industry also used Costus Root essential oil as a flavour ingredient - especially in confectionery, alcoholic and soft drinks.
Note: Middle
Blends well with: Costus root essential oil blends well with patchouli, opopanax, ylang ylang, and any oil with oriental and floral fragrances.
Cautions: Costus Root is not recommended for use in Aromatherapy. It is a dermal irritant.

Cypress French
Plant Part: Needles and Twigs
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: France
Description: The Cypress is a perennial, conical-shaped tree that is about 28 meters (80 feet) high. It is an evergreen with dark green foliage, small flowers and round brown-grey cones with seed nuts inside. The wood is hard and durable, and red-yellow in colour.
Common Uses: Cypress French essential oil has been used to combat excessive perspiration (particularly feet), hemorrhoids, menorrhagia, oily skin, rheumatism, and varicose veins. Aromatherapists also commonly credit Cypress French with being a relaxing, nerve soothing essential oil. It has the properties of an astringent and has been used in skin care applications.
Note: Middle
Blends well with: Cypress French blends well with Bergamot, Clary Sage, Fennel (All), Grapefruit (All), Juniper, Lavender (All), Lemon, Lime, Orange, Pine (All), Rosemary (All) and Tangerine.
Cautions: None known.

Eucalyptus Globulus
Plant Part: Wood and leaves
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: China
Description: The Eucalyptus tree is beautiful; it is a tall evergreen that can grow up to 90 metres high (270 feet). The young trees have oval bluish-green leaves while the mature trees develop long, narrow, yellowish leaves, creamy-white flowers and a smooth, pale grey bark.
Common Uses: Eucalyptus essential oil is fantastic on skin ailments (Burns, blisters, wounds, insect bites, lice, and skin infections), as well as to combat the effects of colds and the flu. There is also a history of Eucalyptus essential oil being applied to sore muscles and joints.
Note: Top
Blends well with: pine, thyme, lavender, rosemary, marjoram, cedarwood and lemon.
Cautions: Eucalyptus should be used in dilution, and avoided during pregnancy.

Fennel Sweet
Plant Part: Seeds
Extraction Method: Steam Distillation
Origin: France
Description: A perennial herb up to 2 meters high with feathery leaves and golden yellow flowers.
Common Uses: Fennel Sweet is credited with being an antiseptic, antispasmodic, carminative, depurative, diuretic, expectorant, laxative, stimulant, splenic, stomachic, and as a vermifuge. It is also believed to be invigorating, restoring, stimulating, and warming.
Note: Top
Cautions: May cause skin irritation. Dilute well before use. Avoid use in sun and if pregnant.

Fir Balsam
Plant Part: Needles
Extraction Method: Steam Distillation
Origin: Canada
Description: Balsam fir Needles are about 3/4 to 1-1/4 inches long with two white stripes running down the underside of each needle.
Common Uses: Fir Balsam essential oil is often used to combat the symptoms of colds - including sore muscles and chest congestion.
Note: Middle
Cautions: Fir balsam is reported to produce dermatitis when applied as perfume in concentrated form. Use well diluted.

Fir Needle
Plant Part: Needles
Extraction Method: Steam distillation
Origin: Russia
Description: Fir needle essential oil comes from the Pinus type tree which grows in wide areas of the former U.S.S.R..
Common Uses: Fir needle is reported to help with arthritis, bronchitis, colds, coughs, flu, muscle aches, rheumatism, sinusitis.
Note: Middle
Cautions: Non-toxic, non-irritant, non-sensitizing. Avoid use in the sun. Liquid may cause irritation to the eyes.

Frankincense
Plant Part: Resin
Extraction Method:
Steam
Origin: Egypt
Description: The Frankincense tree originates from the Middle East, and is small with abundant pinnacle leaves. The flowers are white or pale pink.
Common Uses: The therapeutic properties of Frankincense oil include use as an antiseptic, astringent, carminative, digestive, diuretic, sedative, tonic and expectorant.
Note: Base
Blends well with: basil, bergamot, cardamom, cedarwood, chamomile, cinnamon, clary sage, coriander, geranium, ginger
Cautions: Frankincense oil is non-toxic and non-irritant and could be used by most people.

Geranium Bourbon
Plant Part: Leaves & Flowers
Extraction Method: Steam Distillation
Origin: France
Description: It is a hairy perennial shrub, often used in hedgerows, and stand up to about one meter high (3 feet) with pointed leaves, serrated at the edges and has pinkish-white flowers.
Common Uses: The therapeutic properties of Geranium Bourbon oil include the following as an astringent, haemostatic, diuretic, antiseptic, anti-depressant, tonic, antibiotic, anti-spasmodic and as an anti-infectious agent.
Note: Middle
Blends well with: basil, bergamot, citronella, clary sage, fennel, grapefruit, jasmine, juniper, lavender, lemon, lemongrass, neroli, nutmeg
Cautions: Geranium oil is not recorded as indicating any side effects since it is non-toxic, non-irritant and generally non-sensitizing. It can cause sensitivity in some people and due to the fact that it balances the hormonal system, it should be avoided during pregnancy.

Ginger Root
Plant Part: Root
Extraction Method: CO2 Extraction
Origin: France
Description: Ginger is a perennial herb and grows to about 3 - 4 feet high (approximately 1 meter). It has a characteristic thick spreading tuberous rhizome.
The CO2 extraction method yields a greater number of aromatic compounds from ginger than any other distillation process. In certain conditions at a low temperature Carbon Dioxide or CO2 can be pressurized to become a liquid. This liquid then acts as a solvent and is used to extract the oil from plants. After extraction is completed, the extraction vessel is brought back to normal temperature and the CO2 rapidly converts to gas leaving behind a high quality oil that is free of solvents.
Common Uses: Ginger oil is believed by aromatherapists to be applicable for colds and flu, nausea (motion sickness, morning sickness) muscle aches (particularly the back), circulation issues and arthritic pain. It also has warming properties that help to combat loneliness, and depression. Ginger is also viewed as an aphrodisiac based on it’s energizing properties.
Note: Middle-Base
Blends well with: Ginger blends well with bergamot, sandalwood, ylang-ylang, and other spice oils.
Cautions: Ginger can irritate sensitive skin and is photo-toxic. Sun exposure is to be avoided after application.

Grapefruit Pink
Plant Part: Crude Peel
Extraction Method: Cold Press
Origin: France
Description: The grapefruit tree was originally from Asia. It is now grown and harvested in the United States, France, Brazil and Israel. The Grapefruit tree itself is a large, shiny glossy-leaved tree, about 10 meters (30 feet) high, with white flowers and large, pale yellow fruit.
Common Uses: Grapefruit Pink essential oil is believed by aromatherapists to be a spiritual up-lifter, and to ease muscle fatigue and stiffness. It is also a purifier of congested, oily and acne prone skin. Grapefruit oil is also sometimes added to creams and lotions as a natural toner, and in some circles it is believed to promote hair growth though there is not any medical documentation verifying this.
Note: Medium to Top
Blends well with: Grapefruit pink blends well with other members of the citrus family, rosemary, cypress, lavender, geranium, cardamon and generally most spice oils
Cautions: None declared, though in rare cases it may cause some photosensitization.

Hyssop
Plant Part: Leaves & Flowers
Extraction Method: Steam Distillation
Origin: Slovenja
Description: This shrub decorates the Mediterranean area. It is about 60 cm (2 feet) high and very attractive to bees. It has a woody, hairy stem, small lance-shaped green leaves and purple-blue flowers.
Common Uses: Hyssop is known to help ease sore throats caused by sinus issues. Some authorities believe it can relieve bronchial spasms and thus might be helpful for asthma attacks.
Note: Top
Blends well with: Eucalyptus, ravensara, niaouli, cajeput,myrtle
Cautions: Hyssop oil is non-irritant, non-sensitizing but does contain pinocamphone and should therefore be used in moderation an avoided during pregnancy, by people suffering from epilepsy

Juniper Berry
Plant Part: Berries
Extraction Method: Steam Distillation
Origin: The Himalayas of India
Description: The plant is small bushy shrubs or tree, 3-35 feet in height growing at an altitude ranging from 8800 to 15,400 feet in the Himalayan region . The berries are plucked from the branches of the plant once a year and dried and ground before distillation.
Common Uses: Juniper Berry essential oil is credited as being a supportive, restoring, and tonic aid. Good oil for meditation. Popular oil in weight loss and detox blends, because it is diuretic, and considered purifying and clearing
Note: Middle
Blends well with: clary sage, sandalwood, bergamot, geranium, marjoram. rosemary,chamomile,eucalyptus
Cautions: Non-toxic, non-irritant. Avoid during pregnancy.

Kanuka
Plant Part: Leaves & Stems
Extraction Method: Steam Distilled
Origin: New Zealand
Description: A small bushy tree with pointed leaves on full branches. Kanuka is indigenous to New Zealand.

Common Uses: Aromatherapy, anti-acne preparations, foot care, oral hygiene products, skin and hair care preparations, preparations for prevention of body and foot odour, antibacterial preparations. Kanuka is credited with being an effective antibacterial, Antifungal, and Anti-inflammatory agent. It is also useful for muscular pain relief, sprains and sports injuries. Helps clear inflammation.
Note: Medium
Blends well with: lavender, clary sage, clove, lemon, marjoram, nutmeg, pine, rosemary, ylang ylang
Cautions: Kanuka is a strong oil and should be well diluted in a carrier oil.

Lavender French
Plant Part: Flower Head
Extraction Method: Steam Distilled
Origin: France
Description: An evergreen woody shrub, up to 1 meter tall, with pale green, narrow linear leaves and violet blue flowers.
Common Uses: Lavender French is credited with being an analgesic, anticonvulsant, antidepressant, antiphlogistic, antirheumatic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, bactericidal, carminative, cholagogue, cicatrisant, cordial, cytophylactic, decongestant, deodorant, and as a diuretic. Herbalist regards Lavender as the most useful and versatile essential oil for therapeutic purposes. Lavender is the essential oil most commonly associated with burns and healing of the skin. It also has antiseptic and analgesic properties which will ease the pain of a burn and prevent infection. It also has cytophylactic properties that promote rapid healing and help reduce scarring. Lavender French is a popular choice amongst both aroma-therapists and massage therapists for it's combination of therapeutic quality and pleasant floral scent.
Note: Top
Blends well with: bay, bergamot, chamomile, citronella, clary sage, geranium, jasmine, lemon, mandarin, orange, palmarosa, patchouli, pine, tangerine, thyme, rosemary, rosewood, ylang ylang
Cautions: Non toxic, non irritant and non sensitizing.

Lemon
Plant Part: Peel of the fruit
Extraction Method: Cold Pressed
Origin: Italy
Description: Lemon was originally a small thorny evergreen tree native to India. It is now common in Southern Europe, Florida and California.
Common Uses: Lemon has been historically recognized as a cleanser. It is recognized as being antiseptic, and as having refreshing and cooling properties. Research has also shown lemon essential oil to enhance the ability to concentrate.
Note: Top
Cautions: Non-toxic, but may cause skin irritation in some. Lemon is also phototoxic and should be avoided prior to exposure to direct sunlight.

Lemongrass
Plant Part: Leaves
Extraction Method: Steam Extraction
Origin: India
Description: Lemongrass is a fast growing, tall, aromatic perennial grass that grows up to 1.5 metres in height. It is native to Asia, but is now cultivated mostly in the West Indies, Africa, and Tropical Asia.
Common Uses: Lemongrass is known for its invigorating and antiseptic properties. An excellent anti-depressant, it tones and fortifies the nervous system and can be used in bath for soothing muscular nerves and pain.
Note: Middle
Cautions: Avoid in glaucoma and with children. Use caution in prostatic hyperplasia and with skin hypersensitivity or damaged skin.

Lime
Plant Part: Peel
Extraction Method: Cold Pressed
Origin: Italy
Description: This is a small evergreen tree that produces a small, bitter fruit very similar to Lemon. The fruits themselves are green in color with a green fleshy interior.
Common Uses: Lime essential oil has a crisp, refreshing citrus scent that has been used by aromatherapists for its uplifting and revitalizing properties. It can also act as an astringent on skin where it is reputed to help clear oily skin.
Note: Top
Blends well with: Bergamot, Cedarwood, Geranium Bourbon, Grapefruit Pink and White, Lavender (all types), Lemon, Mandarin, Neroli, Nutmeg, Orange Sweet, Palmarosa, Petitgrain, Rose Absolutes, Rosemary (Both Varieties), Rosewood, Tangerine, Vetiver, Ylang-Ylang
Cautions: Cold Pressed Lime essential oil is phototoxic. Users should avoid direct sunlight after application.

Mandarin
Plant Part: Crude Fruit Peel
Extraction Method: Cold Pressing
Origin: Italy
Description: A member of the orange family, Mandarin trees are smaller than orange trees with small leaves and fruits.
Common Uses: It is often used as a digestive aid, for use against indigestion, hiccups, anxiety, and to assist the liver functions of the elderly. Mandarin essential oil is also commonly used in soaps, cosmetics, perfumes and men's colognes. It also has many applications in the flavoring industry.
Note: Top
Blends well with: other citrus oils such as lime, orange, lemon, and grapefruit, as well as spice oils such as nutmeg, cinnamon, bay and clove.
Cautions: There is some evidence that Mandarin essential oil is phototoxic. Direct sunlight should be avoided after using the mandarin essential oil.

 

Basil
Benzoin
Bergamot
Calamus Root
Camphor (white)
Cape May
Carrot Seed
Cassia
Cedarwood Atlas
Chamomile German
Cinnamon Bark (Co2)
Citronella Ceylon
Clary Sage
Clementine
Clove Bud
Clove Leaf
Costus Root
Cypress French
Eucalyptus Globulus
Fennel Sweet
Fir Balsam
Fir Needle

Pepper Black
Peppermint
Peru Balsam
Petitgrain
Rosalina Austrailian
Rosemary Spanish
Rosewood
Sage
Sandalwood
Spearamint
Spikenard
Spruce White
Tangerine
Tea Tree
Thyme Red
Vanilla
Vetiver
Ylang Ylang

Frankincense
Geranium Bourbon
Ginger Root
Grapefruit Pink
Hyssop
Juniper Berry
Lavender French
Lemon
Lemongrass
Lime
Mandarin
Marjoram Sweet
Melissa Leaf
Myrrh Egyptian
Myrtle
Neroli
Nutmeg
Orange Bitter
Orange Sweet
Palmarosa

Patchouli

Penny Royal

The Different Essential Oils

Marjoram Sweet
Plant Part: Flowers and Leaves
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: France
Description: Marjoram Sweet essential Oil is derived from the plant - a bushy perennial growing up to 60cm in height with a hairy stem, dark green oval leaves and small whitish flowers found in clusters. The entire plant is extremely aromatic.
Common Uses: Warming and comforting, Marjoram Sweet Essential Oil can be massaged into the abdomen during menstruation, or added to a warm compress. It is also useful for treating tired aching muscles, and is perfect for use in a sports massage. A few drops on a vaporizer will also encourage sleep, and a few drops can be added to a warm/hot bath at the first signs of a cold.
Note: Middle
Blends well with: Orange, Lavender, Rosewood, Frankincense, Tea Tree, Eucalyptus, Clary Sage, Basil, Thyme, Cypress, Elemi, Chamomile, spices like Nutmeg or Cardamom and many more
Cautions: Avoid if you are pregnant. Keep out of reach of children.



Melissa Leaf

Plant Part: Leaves
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: USA
Description: Melissa leaf, commonly known as lemon balm, comes from a sweet smelling, bushy herb that grows up to 90 cm high with serrated leaves and tiny white or pink flowers. The high price of Melissa essential oil is due to the fact that approximately 3 tonnes of plant material is required in order to produce approximately 500 ml / 16.66 fl. Oz of essential oil.
Common Uses: Melissa Leaf essential oil is well known for its anti-depressant and uplifting properties. It is also reported to have uses as an antispamodic, bactericidal, carminative, cordial, diaphoretic, nervine, sedative, stomachic, sudorific, and tonic.
Note: Top to Middle
Blends well with: Bergamot, Cedarwood (all), Geranium (All), Jasmine (All), Lavender (All), Lemon, Sweet Marjoram, Neroli, Rose (All), and Ylang-ylang essential oils.
Cautions: Melissa Leaf has possible sensitizing and dermal irritating characteristics. Nonetheless, it is viewed by experts as non-toxic.

Myrrh Egyptian
Plant Part: Resin
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: Egypt
Description: Though classified as shrubs, Myrrh can grow up to 10 Meters in height. The trunk exudes a natural oleoresin that hardens into what is classified as reddish brown œTears. Native collectors make incisions into the trees in order to increase the yield.
Common Uses: Myrrh is thought to enhance spirituality. Aromatherapists use it as an aid in meditation or before healing. It's actions are characterized as the following: antimicrobial, antifungal, astringent and healing, tonic and stimulant, carminative, stomachic, anticatarrhal, expectorant, diaphoretic, vulnerary, locally antiseptic, immune stimulant, bitter, circulatory stimulant, anti-inflammatory, and antispasmodic.
Note: Middle
Blends well with: Frankincense, Lavender (All), Palmarosa, Patchouli, Rose (All), Rosewood, Sandalwood (All), Tea Tree, Thyme (All).
Cautions: Myrrh can be possibly toxic in high concentrations, and should not be used during pregnancy.

Myrtle
Plant Part: Leaves and Twigs
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: France
Description: Myrtle essential oil comes from a small tree with many tough slender boughs. It has a brownish red bark with small pointed leaves. It produces flowers which turn into black berries; both the flowers and leaves are very fragrant.
Common Uses: Myrtle essential oil has common use as an astringent, antiseptic, vulnerary, and as a decongestant.
Note: Middle to Top
Blends well with: Bergamot, Clary Sage, Clove, Hyssop, Eucalyptus, Ginger, Lavender (All), Peppermint (All), Rosemary (All), Spearmint, Thyme (All), and Tea Tree.
Cautions: None known.

Neroli
Plant Part: Blossom
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: Italy
Description: Neroli essential oil is derived from the blossoms of either the sweet orange tree or the bitter orange tree. Our variety comes from the Bitter Orange tree which is viewed within the aromatherapy world as being of higher therapeutic quality.
Common Uses: Neroli essential oil increases circulation and stimulates new cell growth. It can prevent scarring and stretch marks, and has been found useful in treating skin conditions linked to emotional stress. Any type of skin can benefit from Neroli essential oil, although it is particularly good for dry, irritated or sensitive skin. It regulates oiliness and minimizes enlarged pores. Neroli oil helps to clear acne and blemished skin, especially if the skin lacks moisture. With regular treatment, it can reduce the appearance of fragile or broken capillaries and varicose veins. Antidepressant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, carminative, cordial, deodorant, digestive, stimulant (nervous), tonic (cardiac, circulatory).
Note: Middle
Blends well with: Lavender (All), lemon, clary sage, myrrh, spice oils such as nutmeg, cinnamon and clove.
Cautions: None Known.

Nutmeg
Plant Part: Seeds
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: Indonesia
Description: Nutmeg Essential Oil is derived from the evergreen tree capable of growing 20 meters in height. It produces a fleshy red fruit. The exterior husk is dried and produces Mace essential oil, while the seeds produce the Nutmeg essential oil.
Common Uses: Arthritis, constipation, fatigue, muscle aches, nausea, neuralgia, poor circulation, rheumatism, slow digestion.
Note: Middle
Blends well with: Nutmeg is a valuable addition to many aromatherapy blends, adding warmth, spice and inspiration, when used in very small amounts. Lavender, Clary Sage, Geranium, Rosemary, Petitgrain, orange, other spices.
Cautions: If used in large amounts, can cause toxic symptoms such as nausea and tachycardia. This product should also be avoided if pregnant.

Orange Bitter
Plant Part: Peels
Extraction Method: Cold Press
Origin: Italy
Description: The Bitter Orange Tree is an evergreen that grows up to 10m high with glossy dark green leaves and fragrant white flowers. The essential oil is produced by cold pressing of the peel. The Bitter Orange is native to southern China and North-Eastern India. Both the Bitter Orange and Edible Orange trees bear a great resemblance to each other, but their leaf stalks show a noticeable difference. The Bitter Orange is much broader in the shape of a heart.
Common Uses: The bitter orange has properties very similar to the sweet orange. They include the following properties: antidepressant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, carminative, cordial, deodorant, digestive, stimulant (nervous), tonic (cardiac, circulatory). Orange Bitter essential may be used in the same way as oil of turpentine in chronic bronchitis. It is non-irritant to the kidneys and pleasant to take. It has also been applied to combat Colds, constipation, dull skin, flatulence, the flu, gums, slow digestion, and stress.
Note: Top
Blends well with: Lavender (All), lemon, clary sage, myrrh and spicy oils such as nutmeg, cinnamon and clove.
Cautions: Generally non toxic, non irritant, non sensitizing.

Orange Sweet
Plant Part: Peels
Extraction Method: Cold Press
Origin: Brazil
Description: Sweet Orange is derived from an evergreen tree. It Is smaller than the bitter orange tree, and less hardy with fewer or no spines. The fruit itself has a sweet pulp with no bitter membrane.
Common Uses: Sweet Orange Essential Oil is very much like Bitter orange in its applications. Properties are as follows: antidepressant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, carminative, cordial, deodorant, digestive, stimulant (nervous), tonic (cardiac, circulatory). It has also been applied to combat Colds, constipation, dull skin, flatulence, the flu, gums, slow digestion, and stress.
Note: Top
Blends well with: Orange Sweet essential oil blends well with Lavender, Bergamot, Rosewood, lemon, clary sage, myrrh, sandalwood and spicy oils such as nutmeg, cinnamon and clove
Cautions: Some aromatherapists have reported that a small percentage of few people have experienced dermatitis from the limonene content of Sweet Orange.

Palmarosa
Plant Part: Grass
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: India
Description: This wild growing plant has long slender stems and terminal flowering tops. The grassy leaves from which the essential oil is derived is extremely fragrant.
Common Uses: Palmarosa properties include use as an antiseptic, bactericidal, cicatrizant, digestive, febrifuge, hydrating, stimulant (digestive, circulatory), and tonic. It is used extensively as a fragrance component in cosmetics, perfumes and especially soaps due to its excellent tenacity. Aroma therapists recommend it as an oil to diffuse during flu epidemics. Its action against viral illnesses and bacteria - coupled with the attractive smell - make it a great oil to use to disinfect a room. Maggie Tisserand, in her book œStress: The Aromatic Solution recommends Palmarosa for acne, alopecia, lack of concentration and depression with apathy and despair.
Note: Middle
Blends well with: cananga, geranium, rosewood, sandalwood, guaiac wood, cedarwood and floral oils.
Cautions: None known.

Patchouli
Plant Part: Leaves
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: Indonesia
Description: Patchouli is a very fragrant herb with soft oval leaves and square stems. It grows from 2 to 3 feet in height and provides an unusual odor that is nonetheless characteristic of patchouli when the leaves are rubbed. The color of the Patchouli oil is affected by the distillation machine. If distillation is done in Stainless steel then the color will be light, hence if done in Iron then the color will be darker.
Common Uses: Patchouli is recognized by aromatherapists as being effective for combating nervous disorders, helping with dandruff, sores, acne, skin irritations and acne. The specific properties include use as an antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, anti-emetic, antimicrobal, antiphlogistic, antiseptic, antitoxic, antiviral, aphrodisiac, astringent, bactericidal, carminative, deodorant, digestive, diuretic, febrifuge, fungicidal, nerving, prophylactic, stimulating and tonic agent. In the perfumery industry, it is interesting to note that Patchouli improves with age, and that the aged product is what is preferred over freshly harvested. In aromatherapy, Patchouli is an excellent fixative that can help extend other, more expensive oils.
Note: Base
Blends well with: Patchouli blends well with sandalwood, bergamot, cedarwood, rose, sweet orange, cassia, myrrh, opopanax, and clary sage.
Cautions: None Known.

Pennyroyal
Plant Part: Flowers
Extraction Method: Steam Distilled
Origin: France
Description: Pennyroyal is a perennial herb that grows up to 50 cm (20 in) tall with smooth roundish stalks and aromatic, gray-green oval leaves.
Common Uses: The herb and oil were traditionally used to strengthen the nerves, being valuable in hysteric disorders, nervous exhaustion and externally applied for neuralgia. Pennyroyal has a long traditional use as a carminative, diaphoretic, stimulant and as an emmenagogue.
Note: Top
Blends well with: Pennyroyal does not blend well with other oils
Cautions: Pennyroyal oil is toxic, is an abortifacient, and in small quantities can even cause acute liver and lung damage. Use extremely well diluted. It is not recommended for aromatherapy and should only be applied externally.

Pepper Black
Plant Part: Dried Berries
Extraction Method: Steam Distilled
Origin: India
Description: The plant is originally a forest plant and this climbing woody vine uses trees or other supports to grow to about twenty feet high, but is normally kept to about 12 feet for commercial purposes and has a lifespan of about twenty years.
Common Uses: Black pepper oil can be used to help in the treatment of pain relief, rheumatism, chills, flu, colds, increase circulation, exhaustion, muscular aches, physical and emotional coldness, nerve tonic, and fevers. The therapeutic properties of black pepper oil include the following as an analgesic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitoxic, aphrodisiac, digestive, diuretic, febrifuge, laxative, rubefacient, tonic (especially of the spleen).
Note: Middle
Blends well with: Bergamot, Clary Sage, Clove, Coriander, Fennel, Frankincense, Geranium, Ginger, Grapefruit, Lavender, Juniper, Lemon, Lime, Mandarin, Sage, Sandalwood and Ylang Ylang.
Cautions: Black pepper oil may cause irritation to sensitive skins and using too much could over-stimulate the kidneys and should be avoided in pregnancy due to its possible skin sensitizing effect.

Peppermint
Plant Part: Flowering Herb
Extraction Method: Steam Distilled
Origin: India
Description: The peppermint plant is a summer-growing perennial with upright square stems reaching a metre in height at maturity.
Common Uses: Peppermint Supreme is widely credited with being a digestive aid. Peppermint leaves contain menthol, which is a proven aid to digestion. The familiar aroma of Mentha piperita is known for both its warming and cooling properties. Friendly to the sinuses, peppermint is also useful to the muscular system, especially for women during monthly cycles or menopause. Peppermint is commonly known from peppermint tea, chewing gum or candy, but the Essential Oil is much more strong and concentrated and should be used in moderation. Very fresh and clean smelling. Refreshing, mental stimulant, energizing, used to enhance well-being of digestive and respiratory system. Relieves bad breath. Good nerve tonic that helps with mental fatigue and nervous stress.
Note: Middle to Top
Blends well with: Eucalyptus, Lavender, Marjoram, Citrus oils.
Cautions: No known toxicity. Use well diluted since high concentration can cause a burning sensation and sensitization.

Peru Balsam
Plant Part: Crude Balsam
Extraction Method: Steam Distilled
Origin: Canada
Description: Peru balsam is collected from wild trees along the 'Balsam Coast' of El Salvador, though many such trees are available in North America.
Common Uses: Peru Balsam essential oil has been used by aromatherapists for Bronchitis, chapped skin, colds, coughing, eczema, the flu, poor circulation, rashes, sensitive skin, and nervous and stress disorders. It is also believed to promote growth of epithelial cells.
Note: Base
Blends well with: Peru Balsam essential oil blends well with spicy, floral, Oriental and balsamic scented oils.
Cautions: Peru Balsam may cause skin sensitization in some.

Petitgrain
Plant Part: Leaves and Twigs
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: Italy
Description: Petitgrain bigarade is native to Southeast Asia. The tree now grows throughout the Mediterranean and sub-tropic areas worldwide. The bitter orange tree that provides the Petitgrain Essential Oil is also the source of Bitter Orange Oil and Neroli Oil.
Common Uses: Petitgrain is believed to have uplifting properties. Aromatherapists have long used it to calm anger and stress, while it has been used in the skincare industry for acne, oily skin, and as a deodorizing agent.
Note: Top
Blends well with: Bergamot, Cedarwood, Clary sage, Geranium, Lavender, Lime, Jasmine, Neroli, Orange, Palmarosa, Rosemary, Rosewood, Sandalwood and Ylang Ylang.
Cautions: None Known.

Rosalina Australian
Plant Part: Leaves & Twigs
Extraction Method: Steam Distillation
Origin: Australia
Description: Also known as Lavender Tea Tree, Rosalina is tall erect evergreen bushy shrub to small tree, 6-12 mm with grayish papery bark. Leaves are soft, alternate, narrow, and the flowers white to cream colored. The tree can be found distributed in low lying swamps, creeks and behind sand dunes. Southern Victoria along coast to Northern NSW and Bass Strait Islands. Rosalina comes from the same family as tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) and enjoys many of the same attributes as its more famous cousin.
Common Uses: The main constituent of this essential oil, linalool, is a well known antiseptic, spasmolytic and anticonvulsant. It is a wonderful oil for upper respiratory tract congestion and infections, particularly in small children. It is a gentle expectorant with good anti-infectious properties, as well as being a deeply relaxing and calming oil which would be helpful in times of stress and insomnia.
Note: Middle
Blends well with: Australian Rosalina blends well with Lemon Tea tree, Nerolina, Blue Cypress, Lemon myrtle, and Peppermint
Cautions: Rosalina Australian is safe in terms of toxicity and skin irritancy.

Rosemary Spanish
Plant Part: Herb
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: Spain
Description: An aromatic shrub, Rosmarinus officinalis has scaly bark and dense, leathery needlelike leaves. Tiny pale blue blossoms abound from December through spring. Rosemary can grow to heights of five to six feet (close to 2 meters) in height.
Common Uses: Rosemary essential oil stimulates cell renewal. It improves dry or mature skin, eases lines and wrinkles, and heals burns and wounds. It can also clear acne, blemishes or dull dry skin by fighting bacteria and regulating oil secretions. It improves circulation and can reduce the appearance of broken capillaries and varicose veins. Rosemary essential oil helps to overcome mental fatigue and sluggishness by stimulating and strengthening the entire nervous system. It enhances mental clarity while aiding alertness and concentration. Rosemary oil can help you cope with stressful conditions and see things from a clearer perspective.
Note: Top
Blends well with: Rosemary Spanish blends well with most oils, but particularly with basil, cedarwood, frankincense, ginger, grapefruit, orange and peppermint
Cautions: Generally non-toxic and non-sensitizing. Not suitable for people with epilepsy or high blood pressure. Avoid in pregnancy since it is an emmenagogue. Might antidote homeopathic remedies.

Rosewood
Plant Part: Wood
Extraction Method: Steam Distillation
Origin: Brazil
Description: Rosewood is a small evergreen tree now controlled as an endangered species by the Government of Brazil. It has a reddish bark and heartwood. As with all of our oils, we at New Directions Inc. ethically source our products. In this case, it involves attending Government sponsored auctions.
Common Uses: Rosewood is credited with being a Bactericidal, anti-fungal, antiviral, anti-parasitic cellular stimulant, immune system stimulant, tissue regenerator, tonic, antidepressant, antimicrobial, and as an aphrodisiac. It is also regarded as a general balancer to the emotions.
Note: Top
Blends well with: cedarwood, frankincense, geranium, rosemary, mandarin, ylang ylang.
Cautions: Avoid in pregnancy. Possible irritant to sensitive skin.

Sage
Plant Part: Leaves
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: Bulgaria
Description: Salvia officinalis from the Labiatae family is also known as 'garden', 'true' and 'Dalmatian' sage. Common sage is an evergreen perennial herb that can grow up to about 60cm (2 feet) high with a woody base, soft gray-green oval leaves and a mass of blue or violet flowers.
Common Uses: The therapeutic properties of Sage Essential oil are as an anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, astringent, digestive, diuretic, emmenagogue, insecticide, laxative and as a tonic.
Note: Top
Blends well with: Sage Dalmatian essential oil blends well with Bergamot, Lavender, Lemon and Rosemary.
Cautions: Sage is a powerful oil in the hands of an experienced aromatherapists and should be used with care. It is an oral toxin and should not be used during pregnancy, or by persons suffering from epilepsy or high blood pressure.

Sandalwood
Plant Part: Wood
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: India (Mysore Region)
Description: Sandalwood is an evergreen, parasitic tree that burrows its roots into other trees and it can grow up to 9 meters (30 feet) high and has a brown-gray trunk, many smooth slender branches, leathery leaves and small pink-purple flowers. It can take thirty to sixty years for a tree to reach full maturity. That is when it can be harvested and distilled.
Common Uses: Sandalwood East Indian is used by aromatherapists to combat Bronchitis, chapped and dry skin, depression, laryngitis, leucorrhea, oily skin, scars, sensitive skin, stress, and stretch marks. It also has historical applications as an aid in meditation for religious ceremonies. Sandalwood East Indian is believed to create an exotic, sensual mood with a reputation as an aphrodisiac. It also has extensive uses in the perfume industry as a fixative, and use in body care products for the fragrance it provides.
Note: Base
Blends well with: Sandalwood East Indian blends well with most oils. The list includes Rose, Clove Bud, Lavender (All types), Geranium (All Types), Vetiver, Patchouli, Jasmine, Peru Balsam, Benzoin, Bergamot, Clary Sage, Coriander, Cypress (All Types), Fennel (All Types), Frankincense, Galbanum, Myrrh, Palmarosa, Pepper (All Types), Peppermint (All Types), Spearmint, and Vanilla. Aromatic Description : Sandalwood East Indian is a rich, balsamic, sweet fragrance with delicate wood notes that add to it's reputation as a luxurious and exquisite oil.
Cautions: No known toxicity.

Spearmint
Plant Part: Flower Head
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: China
Description: Spearmint is a native of the Mediterranean area. A hardy perennial herb, Spearmint reaches about 1 meter (3 feet) in height. It has characteristic lance-shaped leaves with pink or lilac-colored flowers.
Common Uses: Aromatherapists claim the therapeutic properties of Spearmint essential oil are: as a local/topical anesthetic, antispasmodic, astringent, carminative, decongestant, digestive, diuretic, expectorant, stimulant and restorative. It is also believed to be an uplifting oil great for alleviating fatigue and depression.
Note: Top
Blends well with: Although Spearmint blends well with most essential oils, it blends particularly well with Basil, Birch, Bergamot, Eucalyptus, Jasmine, Lavender and Rosemary.
Cautions: May irritate mucous membranes, but generally Spearmint has no definitive cautions.

Spikenard
Plant Part: Dried root
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: Nepal
Description: Spikenard is a soft, aromatic herb with a strongly pungent rhizome root. It is native to the mountainous regions of Northern India, as well as China and Japan.
Common Uses: Spikenard is used by aromatherapists for rashes, wrinkles, cuts, insomnia, migraines, and wounds.
Note: Base
Cautions: Spikenard should be avoided during pregnancy.

Spruce White
Plant Part: Needles and Twigs
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: Canada
Description: Spruce White is distilled from the leaves and twigs of the conifer tree commonly referred to as a White Spruce. This is a large evergreen tree that grows up to 50 meters tall. It produces small brown cones and has an estimated life span of 1200 years. Spruce white is also very similar to Spruce Hemlock, with slight subjective differences.
Common Uses: Can be used in Asthma, bronchitis, coughs, colds, flu, infection, muscle aches and pains, poor circulation, and respiratory weakness. It is also credited with being a spiritual oil - stabilizing while opening.
Note: Middle
Blends well with: Spruce White blends well with Pine, Cedarwood, Galbanum, Benzoin, Lavender, and Rosemary.
Cautions: Spruce White should be avoided during pregnancy. At low doses it appears to be non-toxic, non-irritating, and non-sensitizing.

Tangerine
Plant Part: Crude Peel
Extraction Method: Cold pressed
Origin: Italy
Description: The Tangerine tree was originally native to China, but is now grown predominantly in the United States and Sicily in Italy. The tree is also very similar to the Mandarin.
Common Uses: Tangerine essential oil, like most of the citrus family, can be depended upon for refreshing and rejuvenating characteristics. Its aroma clears the mind and can help to eliminate emotional confusion. Aromatherapists also consider it to be very comforting, soothing and warming. Users may also see Tangerine used in perfumes, soaps, and as an antispasmodic, carminative, digestive, diuretic, sedative, stimulant (digestive and lymphatic), and tonic agent.
Note: Middle-Top
Blends well with: Tangerine essential oil blends well with Basil, Bergamot, Cinnamon, Clary sage, Clove, Frankincense, Lavender, Lemon, Lime, Neroli, Nutmeg and Orange.
Cautions: Tangerine is similar to other essential oils in the citrus family in that it can be phototoxic. Care should be taken not to expose the skin to sunlight after a treatment. Similarly, the oil should be diluted well before use on the skin.

Tea Tree
Plant Part: Leaves
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: Australia
Description: The Tea Tree is a small tree or shrub with needle-like leaves. It is also domestically referred to as Ti-tree. It can grow up to 7 meters (20 feet) in height and thrives in marshy areas, though it is now cultivated in plantations. The Tea Tree is very robust; it is ready for cutting only two years after its' previous harvest.
Common Uses: Tea Tree essential oil is best known as a very powerful immune stimulant. It can help to fight all three categories of infectious organisms (Bacteria, Fungi, and Viruses), and there is evidence that Tea Tree oil massage prior to an operation may help to fortify the body and reduce post-operative shock, Used in vapor therapy, Tea Tree oil can help with colds, measles, sinusitis and viral infections. For skin and hair, Tea Tree has been used to combat acne, oily skin, head lice and dandruff. As essential oils have become more accepted by the public, the use of Tea Tree has increased significantly. This can be readily evidenced by the commercial products now using Tea Tree essential oil.
Note: Middle
Blends well with: Tea Tree essential oil blends particularly well with Cinnamon, Clary sage, Clove, Geranium, Lavender, Lemon, Myrrh, Nutmeg, Rosewood, Rosemary and Thyme.
Cautions: Tea Tree essential oil may cause dermal sensitization in some people. Do not take internally.

Thyme Red
Plant Part: Herb
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: Hungary
Description: The Thyme plant is an evergreen perennial shrub that grows up to 45 cm (18 inches) in height. It has a woody root system, a multi-branched stem, small elliptical greenish gray aromatic leaves and pale purple or white flowers. Thyme is derived from the Greek word 'thymos' that means 'perfume'. White Thyme can also be derived from this species if the Red Thyme is further distilled; nonetheless, White Thyme is more commonly derived from the Thymus Zygis species.
Common Uses: Red Thyme essential oil has been used effectively as a bactericide, antiseptic, antimicrobial, astringent, antispasmodic, antitoxic, diuretic, antifungal, insecticide, tonic, and as an immune stimulant. Thyme oil can assist with nervous complaints, respiratory problems, poor circulation and problems of the digestive system.
Note: Middle
Blends well with: Red Thyme essential oil blends particularly well with Bergamot, Grapefruit, Lemon, Lavender, Rosemary and Pine.
Cautions: Avoid during pregnancy, or if a history of high blood pressure exists. Red thyme contains a high amount of toxic phenols (carvacrol and thymol) that can irritate mucous membranes, cause skin irritation and skin sensitization.

Vanilla
Plant Part: Fruit
Extraction Method: Food Grade Solvent
Origin: India
Description: Vanilla is a perennial herbaceous climbing vine that can grow up to 25 meters (82 feet) high and that is native to Central America and Mexico. In cultivation the deep trumpet-shaped flowers of the Vanilla must be hand-pollinated; while in Mexico the native humming bird does the work. The green capsules or fruit are picked, cured, and the immature Vanilla pod or bean is fermented and dried to turn it into a fragrant brown vanilla bean.
Our variety is a ten-fold bourbon; this refers to the concentration of the essential oil. Ten fold essential oils are considered to be superior to the extracts commonly sold.
Common Uses: Vanilla essential oil is considered a premiere sensual aphrodisiac and one of the most popular flavors/aromas. Comforting and relaxing. It is also an ingredient in Oriental type perfumes.
Note: Middle-Top
Blends well with: Bergamot, Grapefruit, Lemon, Mandarin, Orange, Sandalwood, Tangerine, and Vetiver.
Cautions: No known toxicity Avoid high concentration in pregnancy. Avoid very high concentrations in skin care.

Vetiver
Plant Part: Root
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: India
Description: Vetiver essential oil is derived from the complex white root system of a grass used in India and Sri Lanka for the creation of woven matting.
Common Uses: Deeply relaxing and comforting. It is also used as a base note in perfumery and aromatherapy applications.
Note: Base
Blends well with: Cedarwood, Chamomile, Frankincense, Ginger, Jasmine, Juniper, Lavender, Lemongrass, Patchouli, Rose, Sandalwood, Spikenard, Vanilla, and Ylang Ylang.
Cautions: None known

Ylang Ylang
Plant Part: Flower
Extraction Method: Steam
Origin: France
Description: Ylang ylang oil is extracted from Cananga odorata - also known as flower of flowers. Ylang ylang is a tall tropical tree about 20 meters (60 feet) high with large, tender, fragrant pink, mauve or yellow flowers. The yellow heads are viewed as being the best in terms of quality.
Common Uses: Ylang ylang oil can assist with problems such as high blood pressure, rapid breathing and heartbeat, nervous conditions, as well as impotence and frigidity. Spiritual practitioners claim that the users of Ylang Ylang are those who have been drawn to the oil, and who in turn, suit it.
Note: Base to Middle
Blends well with: Bergamot, Grapefruit, Lavender, Neroli, Rosewood and Sandalwood.
Cautions: Ylang Ylang can cause sensitivity on some people and excessive use of it may lead to headaches and nausea.